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서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원> Seoul Journal of Korean Studies

Seoul Journal of Korean Studies update

  • : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원
  • : 인문과학분야  >  한국사
  • : KCI등재
  • : SCOPUS
  • : 연속간행물
  • : 반년간
  • : 1225-0201
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수록정보
수록범위 : 1권0호(1988)~34권2호(2021) |수록논문 수 : 496
Seoul Journal of Korean Studies
34권2호(2021년 12월) 수록논문
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This article aims to reconsider the significance of the controversy surrounding Queen Munjeong's (1501-65) reinstatement of the two Buddhist orders, Seon (meditation) and Gyo (doctrine), by using it as a window onto the nature of politics in the Joseon Dynasty. Queen Munjeong's restoration of Buddhism has received significant scholarly attention since the early 1990s, and most studies agree that the queen mother was able to bring her pro-Buddhist policy to fruition thanks to her supporters, i.e., officials loyal to her. Nevertheless, these allies were also found to have articulated opposition to her pro-Buddhist policies. Thus it would be logical to query what significance the disputes might have had in the context of early and mid-Joseon political dynamics. In King Myeongjong's reign, the monarch had to share power with the high-ranking officials and bureaucrats; the scholar-officials were acting as arbiters and the king sought their approval prior to taking any action. In case of a dispute, precedents were invoked to substantiate one's claim. By closely reading the contestations, I argue that Queen Munjeong's restoration of the Buddhist orders was an aborted attempt at establishing a precedent that the throne could use to its advantage in its attempts to wrestle back control from the scholar-officials.

KCI등재 SCOPUS

2The Dream of the Solidarity of the Downtrodden: Yi Yeoseong (1901-?) and His Work on Global Anti-Imperialist Movements

저자 : Vladimir Tikhonov

발행기관 : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원 간행물 : Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 34권 2호 발행 연도 : 2021 페이지 : pp. 261-297 (37 pages)

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Yi Yeoseong (1901-?) exemplifies the hybridity and complexity of Korea's ideological landscape in the colonial age. During his lifetime Yi, a scion of a Confucian-turned- Christian family, evolved from a nationalist into a Marxist. His Marxism, however, was of a strongly “national” kind, as Yi's main concern was the preservation and development of Korea's indigenous cultural tradition in the era of colonial modernity. This article aims at demonstrating that Yi's paradigm of national liberation was at the same time profoundly internationalist. Parallel to his concerns for Korea's fate, Yi was deeply interested in a range of anti-colonial movements internationally. His interests spanned French Vietnam, British India, Indonesia under Dutch control, but also the situation in the Philippines and even the Jewish-Arab struggles in Palestine and the anti-racist struggles of US Blacks. In Europe, Yi focused on the history of the Irish independence movement. This article will demonstrate that Yi's manifold writings on the global anticolonial struggles combined Marxist methodology with a nationalist thrust to find abroad some analogies for Korea's own colonial predicament. It is to be hoped that this article will contribute to rediscovering Yi as one of the major colonial-era Korean Marxist thinkers with a global reach.

KCI등재 SCOPUS

3Between Imperial and Colonial Universities: The Institutional Characteristics and Coloniality of Keijō Imperial University

저자 : Joon Young Jung

발행기관 : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원 간행물 : Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 34권 2호 발행 연도 : 2021 페이지 : pp. 299-331 (33 pages)

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Keijō Imperial University was a Japanese Imperial University established in colonial Korea in 1926. Although the university's organizational culture mirrored those of the Imperial Universities in the mainland Japan, its birth during colonial rule mired it in tension and conflict over its orientation as a modern university and classification as an elite university with colonial origins. Institutionally, Keijō Imperial University functioned by intertwining modern, imperialist, and colonial characteristics. However, studies on the university have primarily focused on only one of these aspects. This study focuses on the two unique institutions that distinguish Keijō Imperial University from the other Imperial Universities in mainland Japan: the Pre-University Department and its finance system. The Pre-University Department was an affiliate institution of Keijō Imperial University that helped prevent colonial students from leaving the colony and managed them through division and control. The university finance system of Keijō Imperial University was subordinate to the Japanese Government-General of Korea. These are two examples that demonstrate the complex dynamics of Keijō Imperial University at the institutional level. As a colonial state institution, Keijō Imperial University ultimately found it impossible to break free from its intrinsic, colonially embedded limitations.

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This paper argues that shamanic instruments known as mengdu are revered as sacred on Jeju-do and that the smiths who make the mengdu, as creators of divine mengdu and as transmitters of these instruments to the simbang (Jeju shamans), are regarded as sacred beings. The relationship between shamans and smiths could be seen in many places in Korea, including Jeju-do, until quite recently, though it has become difficult to identify in the course of time. On Jeju, where the sacred power and role of smiths were in evidence until twenty years ago, smiths were considered sacred because they make the material god mengdu. This job is extremely challenging because the mengdu are themselves a kind of sillyeong, which can be offended during the process of being made into metal instruments. Although sillyeong are defined as “spirits or natural objects that are served as gods,” this definition should be expanded, for the mengdu are metal “artifacts” also served as gods. The smith making the mengdu also performs the mengdu gosa, in which he unites the new mengdu with its soul and divines the future of the simbang. It is not the shaman but the smith who is the first user of the new set of mengdu for divination. Since full-time smiths making the mengdu do not exist any longer on Jeju, a renowned young simbang is currently doing the work of creating gods out of metal, showing again that “smiths and shamans are from the same nest.”

KCI등재 SCOPUS

5Jaroslav Bařinka: Reflections on Czechoslovak- Korean Cold War Encounters

저자 : Vladimír Hlásny

발행기관 : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원 간행물 : Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 34권 2호 발행 연도 : 2021 페이지 : pp. 357-401 (45 pages)

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Jaroslav Bařinka, a leading Czech scholar of Koreanology, founding figure of Koreanology in Czechoslovakia, and among the longest-serving Czech diplomats operating in both Koreas, died at the age of eighty-nine on October 3, 2020. Bařinka made invaluable contributions introducing Korean traditional culture, archeology, and literature to non-Korean audiences, based on his extensive travels in the Koreas, Japan, and China spanning half a century. He served as an interpreter and Second Secretary at the Czechoslovak embassy in Pyongyang starting in 1955 and intermittently after that until 1976. He was the first Czech civilian to visit the ROK in 1970, returning there during the 1988 Olympics and in 1991 as Czechoslovakia's―and in 1993 Czechia's― first chargé d'affaires to Seoul. He was famous for his meticulous note-taking, sharp eyes, and technical knowledge. To the moment of his death he could talk at length about metallurgical deposits across Czechia and North Korea, their extraction processes, and their chemical properties―or about Confucian writings and architecture. This article recounts Bařinka's experiences from his long career in Korean scholarship, interpretation and diplomacy, with the aim of shedding light on Czechoslovak-Korean political relations, scholarly and cultural exchanges, and physical encounters from the 1950s to the 2000s. It is a record of conversations based on fifteen long interviews with Bařinka which took place between October 2014 and August 2019, with the objective of tracing the beginnings of Koreanology in Czechoslovakia. The content and style follow Bařinka's presentation as closely as possible, and errors, omissions, and biases are not carefully flagged, with the aim of accurately reflecting Bařinka's own narrative. In instances where editorial intervention is warranted, references to sources of additional information and corroborations of Bařinka's account are separated clearly from Bařinka's own account.

KCI등재 SCOPUS

6Newly Discovered Sources on Carl von Waeber (1841-1910): Sylvia Bräsel, “Bilder eines Diplomatenlebens zwischen Europa und Ostasien”

저자 : Tatiana M. Simbirtseva , Sergei V. Volkov

발행기관 : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원 간행물 : Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 34권 2호 발행 연도 : 2021 페이지 : pp. 403-410 (8 pages)

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KCI등재 SCOPUS

7Religious and Philosophical Traditions of Korea

저자 : Yeonwoo Joh

발행기관 : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원 간행물 : Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 34권 2호 발행 연도 : 2021 페이지 : pp. 411-414 (4 pages)

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KCI등재 SCOPUS

8Divorce in South Korea: Doing Gender and the Dynamics of Relationship Breakup

저자 : Caren Freeman

발행기관 : 서울대학교 규장각한국학연구원 간행물 : Seoul Journal of Korean Studies 34권 2호 발행 연도 : 2021 페이지 : pp. 414-417 (4 pages)

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